Jump to content
Les Forums d'Infoclimat

Ce tchat, hébergé sur une plateforme indépendante d'Infoclimat, est géré et modéré par une équipe autonome, sans lien avec l'Association.
Un compte séparé du site et du forum d'Infoclimat est nécessaire pour s'y connecter.

Sign in to follow this  
david3

2006

Recommended Posts

This preliminary information for 2006 is based on observations up to the end of November

WMO-No. 768

WMO Statement on the Status of the global Climate in 2006

http://www.wmo.ch/web/Press/PR_768_English.doc

( http://www.wmo.ch/news/news.html )

Embargo 17:00 GMT 14 December, 2006

GENEVA, 14 December (WMO) – The global mean surface temperature in 2006 is currently estimated to be + 0.42°C above the 1961-1990 annual average (14°C/57.2°F), according to the records maintained by Members of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The year 2006 is currently estimated to be the sixth warmest year on record. Final figures will not be released until March 2007.

Averaged separately for both hemispheres, 2006 surface temperatures for the northern hemisphere (0.58°C above 30-year mean of 14.6°C/58.28°F) are likely to be the fourth warmest and for the southern hemisphere (0.26°C above 30-year mean of 13.4°C/56.12°F), the seventh warmest in the instrumental record from 1861 to the present.

Since the start of the 20th century, the global average surface temperature has risen approximately 0.7°C. But this rise has not been continuous. Since 1976, the global average temperature has risen sharply, at 0.18°C per decade. In the northern and southern hemispheres, the period 1997-2006 averaged 0.53°C and 0.27°C above the 1961-1990 mean, respectively.

Regional temperature anomalies

The beginning of 2006 was unusually mild in large parts of North America and the western European Arctic islands, though there were harsh winter conditions in Asia, the Russian Federation and parts of eastern Europe. Canada experienced its mildest winter and spring on record, the USA its warmest January-September on record and the monthly temperatures in the Arctic island of Spitsbergen (Svalbard Lufthavn) for January and April included new highs with anomalies of +12.6°C and +12.2°C, respectively.

Persistent extreme heat affected much of eastern Australia from late December 2005 until early March with many records being set (e.g. second hottest day on record in Sydney with 44.2°C/111.6°F on 1 January). Spring 2006 (September-November) was Australia’s warmest since seasonal records were first compiled in 1950. Heat waves were also registered in Brazil from January until March (e.g. 44.6°C/112.3°F in Bom Jesus on 31 January – one of the highest temperatures ever recorded in Brazil).

Several parts of Europe and the USA experienced heat waves with record temperatures in July and August. Air temperatures in many parts of the USA reached 40°C/104°F or more. The July European-average land-surface air temperature was the warmest on record at 2.7°C above the climatological normal.

Autumn 2006 (September-November) was exceptional in large parts of Europe at more than 3°C warmer than the climatological normal from the north side of the Alps to southern Norway. In many countries it was the warmest autumn since official measurements began: records in central England go back to 1659 (1706 in The Netherlands and 1768 in Denmark).

Prolonged drought in some regions

Long-term drought continued in parts of the Greater Horn of Africa including parts of Burundi, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, and the United Republic of Tanzania. At least 11 million people were affected by food shortages; Somalia was hit by the worst drought in a decade.

For many areas in Australia, the lack of adequate rainfall in 2006 added to significant longer-term dry conditions, with large regions having experienced little recovery from the droughts of 2002-2003 and 1997-1998. Dry conditions have now persisted for 5 to 10 years in some areas and in south-west Western Australia for around 30 years.

Across the USA, moderate-to-exceptional drought persisted throughout parts of the south-west desert and eastward through the southern plains, also developing in areas west of the Great Lakes. Drought and anomalous warmth contributed to a record wildfire season for the USA, with more than 3.8 million hectares burned through early December. Drought in the south of Brazil caused significant damage to agriculture in the early part of the year with losses of about 11 per cent estimated for the soybean crop yield alone.

Severe drought conditions also affected China. Millions of hectares of crops were damaged in Sichuan province during summer and in eastern China in autumn. Significant economic losses as well as severe shortages in drinking water were other consequences.

Heavy precipitation and flooding

As the 2005/2006 rainy season was ending, most countries in southern Africa were experiencing satisfactory rainfall during the first quarter of 2006. In northern Africa, floods were recorded in Morocco and Algeria during 2006 causing infrastructure damage and some casualties. Rare heavy rainfall in the Sahara Desert region of Tindouf produced severe flooding in February damaging 70 per cent of food stocks and displacing 60 000 people. In Bilma, Niger, the highest rainfall since 1923 affected nearly 50 000 people throughout August. In the same month, the most extensive precipitation in 50 years brought significant agricultural losses to the region of Zinder, Niger. Heavy rain also caused devastating floods in Ethiopia in August, claiming more than 600 lives. Some of the worst floods occurred in Dire Dawa and along the swollen Omo River. Again in October and November, the Great Horn of Africa countries experienced heavy rainfall associated with severe flooding. The worst hit areas were in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia. Somalia is undergoing its worst flooding in recent history; some places have received more than six times their average monthly rainfall and hundreds of thousands of people have been affected. This year’s floods are said to be the worst in 50 years in the Great Horn of Africa region. The heavy rains followed a period of long-lasting drought and the dry ground was unable to soak up large amounts of rainfall.

Heavy rainfall in Bolivia and Equador in the first months of the year caused severe floods and landslides with tens of thousands of people affected. Torrential rainfall in Suriname during early May produced the country’s worst disaster in recent times.

After 500 mm of torrential rainfall during a five-day period in February, a large-scale landslide occurred in Leyte Island, the Philippines with more than 1 000 casualties. Although close to average in total rainfall, the Indian monsoon season brought many heavy rainfall events with the highest rainfall in 24-hours ever recorded in several locations.

Only months after the destructive summer flooding in eastern Europe in 2005, heavy rainfall and snowmelt produced extensive flooding along the River Danube in April and the river reached its highest level in more than a century. Areas of Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and Serbia were the hardest hit with hundreds of thousands of hectares inundated and tens of thousands of people affected.

Persistent and heavy rainfall during 10-15 May brought historic flooding to New England (USA), described as the worst in 70 years in some areas. Across the US mid-Atlantic and north-east, exceptionally heavy rainfall occurred in June. Numerous daily and monthly records were set and the rainfall caused widespread flooding which forced the evacuation of some 200 000 people. Vancouver in Canada experienced its wettest month ever in November with 351 mm, nearly twice the average monthly accumulation.

Development of moderate El Niño in late 2006

Conditions in the equatorial Pacific from December 2005 until the first quarter of 2006 showed some patterns typically associated with La Niña events. These however, did not lead to a basin-wide La Niña and, during April, even weak La Niña conditions dissipated. Over the second quarter of 2006, the majority of atmospheric and oceanic indicators reflected neutral conditions but, in August, conditions in the central and western equatorial Pacific started resembling typical early stages of an El Niño event (see WMO Press Release 765). By the end of the year, positive sea-surface temperature anomalies were established across the tropical Pacific basin. The El Niño event is expected by global consensus to continue at least into the first quarter of 2007.

Deadly typhoons in south-east Asia

In the north-west Pacific, 22 tropical cyclones developed (average 27), 14 of which classified as typhoons. Typhoons Chanchu, Prapiroon, Kaemi, Saomai, Xangsane, Cimaron and tropical storm Bilis brought deaths, casualties and severe damage to the region. Landed tropical cyclones caused more than 1 000 fatalities and economic losses of US $ 10 billion in China, which made 2006 the severest year in a decade. Typhoon Durian affected some 1.5 million people in the Philippines in November/December 2006, claiming more than 500 lives with hundreds still missing.

During the 2006 Atlantic hurricane season, nine named tropical storms developed (average: ten). Five of the named storms were hurricanes (average six) and two of those were “major” hurricanes (category three or higher on the Saffir-Simpson scale). In the eastern North Pacific 19 named storms developed, which is well above the average of 16; eleven reached hurricane strength of which six attained “major” status.

Twelve tropical cyclones developed in the Australian Basin, two more than the long-term average. Tropical cyclone Larry was the most intense at landfall in Queensland since 1918, destroying 80-90 per cent of the Australian banana crop.

Ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic

On 25 September, the maximum area of the 2006 ozone hole over the Antarctic was recorded at 29.5 million km², slightly larger than the previous record area of 29.4 million km² reached in September 2000. These values are so similar that the ozone holes of these two years could be judged of equal size. The size and persistence of the 2006 ozone hole area with its ozone mass deficit of 40.8 megatonnes (also a record) can be explained by the continuing presence of near-peak levels of ozone-depleting substances in combination with a particularly cold stratospheric winter. Low temperatures in the first part of January prompted a 20 per cent loss in the ozone layer over the Arctic in 2006 (see WMO Press Release 760). Milder temperatures from late January precluded the large ozone loss seen in 2005.

Arctic sea-ice decline continues

The year 2006 continues the pattern of sharply decreasing Arctic sea ice. The average sea-ice extent for the entire month of September was 5.9 million km², the second lowest on record missing the 2005 record by 340 000 km². Including 2006, the September rate of sea ice decline is now approximately -8.59% per decade, or 60 421 km² per year.

Information sources

This preliminary information for 2006 is based on observations up to the end of November

from networks of land-based weather stations, ships and buoys. The data are collected and disseminated on a continuing basis by the National Meteorological and Hydrological Services of WMO Members. However, the declining state of some observational platforms in some parts of the world is of concern.

It should be noted that, following established practice, WMO’s global temperature analyses are based on two different datasets. One is the combined dataset maintained by the Hadley Centre of the UK Met Office, and the Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, UK. The other is maintained by the US Department of Commerce’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Results from these two datasets are comparable: both indicate that 2006 is likely to be the sixth warmest year globally.

More extensive updated information will be made available in the annual WMO Statement on the Status of the Global Climate in 2006, to be published in early March 2007.

This is a joint Press Release issued in collaboration with the Hadley Centre of the Met Office, UK, the Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, UK and in the USA: NOAA’s National Climatic Data Centre, National Environmental Satellite and Data Information Service and NOAA’s National Weather Service. Other contributors are WMO Member countries: Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Denmark, India, Ireland, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Mauritius, Morocco, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Romania, Sweden and Switzerland. The African Centre of Meteorological Applications for Development (ACMAD) also contributed.

WMO is the United Nations' authoritative voice on weather, climate and water

************

For more information please contact:

Mr Mark Oliver, Press Officer, Communications and Public Affairs Office, World Meteorological Organization. Tel: +41 (0)22 730 84 17, E-mail: moliver@wmo.int

Ms Carine Richard-Van Maele, Chief, Communications and Public Affairs, WMO.

Tel: +41 (0)22 730 83 15. Mobile: +41 79 406 47 30. E-mail: cpa@wmo.int

Internet websites: http://www.wmo.int

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Comme toujours l'HS est à mi-chemin de l'HN. On avance en général que l'inertie thermique des océans (et leur distribution au nord et au sud de l'Equateur) explique cette différence. Toutefois, sur la carte Nasa-Giss Dec-Nov 2006, on constate que les terres de l'HS se réchauffent moins elles aussi. Je pense que la masse antarctique et la circulation par le mode annulaire austral / SAM doivent aussi changer la donne. Des idées ou des infos à ce sujet ?

ghcngisshr2sst1200kmanora7.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deux autres éléments peuvent contribuer à expliquer cette différence entre HN et HS:

- La majorité des émissions anthropiques de GES ont lieu dans l'HN

- La zone des calmes équatoriaux ralentit les échanges gazeux entre les deux hémisphéres.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

Location : Muret(180 m) et Font-Romeu (1760m)

Comme toujours l'HS est à mi-chemin de l'HN. On avance en général que l'inertie thermique des océans (et leur distribution au nord et au sud de l'Equateur) explique cette différence. Toutefois, sur la carte Nasa-Giss Dec-Nov 2006, on constate que les terres de l'HS se réchauffent moins elles aussi. Je pense que la masse antarctique et la circulation par le mode annulaire austral / SAM doivent aussi changer la donne. Des idées ou des infos à ce sujet ?

http://img237.imageshack.us/img237/2985/gh...200kmanora7.gif

La proportion de terres est bien moindre dans l'HS par rapport à l'HN.

Ces terres sont de plus relativement "petites" et donc fortement soumises à l'influence générale océanique.

On peut d'ailleurs remarquer qu'il y a continuité entre les continents de l'HS et les mers de l'HS au niveau anomalie.

Enfin une grosse partie des terres est près de l'équateur et donc l'annomalie y est plus faible.

C'est d'ailleurs assez semblable à ce qui se passe dans l'HN.

La très grosse différence est entre les régions au-dessus de 60°N et en-dessous de 60°S.

Et là il est clair que l'influence de l'Antarctique est certaine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deux autres éléments peuvent contribuer à expliquer cette différence entre HN et HS:

- La majorité des émissions anthropiques de GES ont lieu dans l'HN

- La zone des calmes équatoriaux ralentit les échanges gazeux entre les deux hémisphéres.

Non, les mesures de CO2 faites à l'Ile d'Amsterdam étaient déjà copie conformes de celles faites à Hawai il y a 20 ans et avec la même variation intrannuelle.

Meteor a raison. C'est d'ailleurs essentiel dans le mécanisme des glaciations (Milankho..)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Non, les mesures de CO2 faites à l'Ile d'Amsterdam étaient déjà copie conformes de celles faites à Hawai il y a 20 ans et avec la même variation intrannuelle.

Euh... d'après le World data center for GHG, il ne semble pas que la variation de CO2 à l'ile Amsterdam (courbe rouge) soit vraiment copie conforme de celle de Mauna-Loa (courbe verte) à part qu'elles sont annuellement synchronisées.

Ne parlons pas de celle de Ryori (Antarctique) qui, elle, est carréement inversée...

CO2-atmospherique-interannu.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

Location : Muret(180 m) et Font-Romeu (1760m)

Ce qui compte c'est la moyenne annuelle.

Il est évident que les fluctuations saisonnières ne sont pas identiques d'un hémisphère à l'autre.

Toutes ces moyennes sont équivalentes à 1 ou 2 ppm près.

Et ce ne sont pas 1 ou 2 ppm qui vont faire changer la température de 2, 1, 0.5 et même 0.1°C!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fais ce calcul que tu trouves simple (tableur) et tu verras s'évanouir tes hypothèses scientifiques.

Après tout c'est PE (que tu soutiens) qui a commencé à sous-entendre qu'il y avait de grands écarts entre ces courbes sur une échelle pluri-annuelle, en inférant à partir de l'observation des variations saisonnières. Il doute, Il démontre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je n'ai pas soutenu tout ça. J'ai simplement dit que les courbes n'étaient pas des copies conformes. Les écarts intersaisonniers (maxis et minis) sont en effet de 2 à 3 ppm.

La forme de la courbe pour la station Antarctique de Syowa est, quant à elle, complètement inversée. On peut tout de même se poser quelques questions...

Les moyennes présentes une différence de -0.13 à 2,56 ppm entre les stations de l'HS et celles de l'HN. C'est voisin de la valeur de la variation annuelle actuelle du CO2. Mais, des sources de CO2 non anthropiques (maritimes), existent, évidemment, dans l'HS.

La source de très loin la plus importante n'est pas d'origine anthropique : c'est la végétation. Heureusement, elle se transforme en puits tous les ans...

CO2-HS-HN.jpg

(Je réponds juste à cause du "C" majuscule du qualificatif).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On peut tout de même se poser quelques questions...

Lesquelles ?Pourquoi cette variabilité spatio-temporelle ne serait-elle pas normale ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Les données NOAA moyennées sur 60 sites

Croissance annuelle CO2 NOAA

http://www.cmdl.noaa.gov/ccgg/trends/index.php#global

1990 1.27

1991 0.82

1992 0.64

1993 1.13

1994 1.62

1995 2.03

1996 1.10

1997 1.96

1998 2.91

1999 1.37

2000 1.25

2001 1.85

2002 2.36

2003 2.23

2004 1.65

2005 2.42

Les épisodes 1991-92 (Pinatubo) et 1998 (El Nino), double record depuis 1990, montre que la variabilité du CO2 atmosphérique est effectivement dépendante en partie de la variabilité naturelle aussi. (Normal, les activités humaines ne changent pas autant que cela d'une année sur l'autre).

Au rythme où cela va, on devrait être entre 384 et 388 ppm en 2010, plus proches des valeurs basses des SRES. Sans parler du méthane, où il était prévu 1850-1950 ppb avec hausse 2000-2010 supérieure à 1990-2000, ce qui est mal parti.

Comme les SRES sont la seule partie des modèles où l'on a une synthèse des estimations tous les dix ans, cela permet au moins de voir ce qu'il en est de la fiabilité des scenarii par rapport à la réalité.

On ne peut pas en déduire grand chose pour 2100, d'ailleurs. Disons que si 2010 avait été pire que prévu, on en entendrait beaucoup parler dans les gazettes de la catastrophe annoncée. Comme cela semble plutôt bien parti pour être le contraire, on restera discret.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lesquelles ?

Pourquoi cette variabilité spatio-temporelle ne serait-elle pas normale ?

Je ne dis pas qu'elle est anormale. Je cherche des explications...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

Location : Muret(180 m) et Font-Romeu (1760m)

Au rythme où cela va, on devrait être entre 384 et 388 ppm en 2010, plus proches des valeurs basses des SRES. Sans parler du méthane, où il était prévu 1850-1950 ppb avec hausse 2000-2010 supérieure à 1990-2000, ce qui est mal parti.

Ok pour le CH4.

Par contre pour le CO2 je n'ai pas tout à fait le même avis.

Nous sommes à fin 2006 à 382 ppm.

Si l'on prend la moyenne des augmentations des 5 dernières années soit 2 ppm cela fera 390 ppm à fin 2010.

Si l'on prend la moyenne des années dont tu as donné la liste cela ferait 389 ppm.

La moyenne de tous les scenarii est de 390 ppm (ISAM model (reference)) pour 2010.

Mais si l'on considère la somme des forçages des différents GES je suis assez d'accord pour dire que nous sommes plutôt dans la partie basse de la fourchette et cela grâce, en particulier, au CH4.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Le calcul que Pierre Ernest a eu l'amabilité de faire montre qu'il reste 1,8 ppm d'écart entre les min. et max. des courbes moyennées sur trois ans. Je ne sais pas si c'est "grand", je n'ai pas souvenir que Pierre Ernest ait fait cette assertion. Il a simplement répondu à Sirius :

"d'après le World data center for GHG, il ne semble pas que la variation de CO2 à l'ile Amsterdam (courbe rouge) soit vraiment copie conforme de celle de Mauna-Loa (courbe verte)"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nous sommes à fin 2006 à 382 ppm.

Si l'on prend la moyenne des augmentations des 5 dernières années soit 2 ppm cela fera 390 ppm à fin 2010.

Si l'on prend la moyenne des années dont tu as donné la liste cela ferait 389 ppm.

Pour la moyenne 2006, j'avais vu des valeurs plus basses, mais après vérification sur NOAA, on sera sans doute pas loin de tes valeurs, vers 381 ppm. Donc OK pour la précision.

Moyenne du "globally averaged marine surface data" pour les dix premiers mois 2006 :

GLB 2006 01 381.09

GLB 2006 02 381.71

GLB 2006 03 382.08

GLB 2006 04 382.40

GLB 2006 05 382.34

GLB 2006 06 381.50

GLB 2006 07 379.87

GLB 2006 08 378.41

GLB 2006 09 378.57

GLB 2006 10 380.24

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

Location : Muret(180 m) et Font-Romeu (1760m)

Le calcul que Pierre Ernest a eu l'amabilité de faire montre qu'il reste 1,8 ppm d'écart entre les min. et max. des courbes moyennées sur trois ans. Je ne sais pas si c'est "grand", je n'ai pas souvenir que Pierre Ernest ait fait cette assertion. Il a simplement répondu à Sirius :

"d'après le World data center for GHG, il ne semble pas que la variation de CO2 à l'ile Amsterdam (courbe rouge) soit vraiment copie conforme de celle de Mauna-Loa (courbe verte)"

Oui, certes, mais cela n'avait pas grand-chose à voir avec le débat que tu avais toi-même initié concernant le delta d'anomalie entre l'HS et l'HN.

Nous ne connaissons pas avec précision le delta CO2 entre les deux hémisphères, mais il ne dépasse pas à mon sens, 1ppm.

Le forçage radiatif de 1 ppm de CO2 est l'ordre de 0.014W/m2.

Il peut donc expliquer une variation de l'ordre du centième de degré, selon les connaissances que nous avons.

A mon sens bien plus importantes sont les variations d'aérosols.

Il est bien connu que l'aérosol est quelque chose de plus local et de plus proche de son lieu d'émission(il y a de bonnes raisons pour cela) que les GES à durée de vie bp plus longue.

Les variations de ces aérosols, de mémoire, concernent bien d'avantage l'HN que l'HS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Il est bien connu que l'aérosol est quelque chose de plus local et de plus proche de son lieu d'émission(il y a de bonnes raisons pour cela) que les GES à durée de vie bp plus longue.

Les variations de ces aérosols, de mémoire, concernent bien d'avantage l'HN que l'HS.

Oui, mais cela ne contribue pas à expliquer pas le décalage HN / HS, au contraire. En moyenne, il y a toujours plus d'aérosols anthropique en HN qu'en HS, donc on peut supposer l'effet inverse (les aérosols contribuent plus à refroidir l'HN et à égaliser les deux hémisphères).

Inversement, la rétroaction vapeur d'eau doit être plus forte là où il y a le plus d'océans (je suppose, vu la durée de vie très courte de la VE) donc elle devrait réchauffer l'HS plus que l'HN. Sauf si la rétroaction nébulosité est plus marquée.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

Location : Muret(180 m) et Font-Romeu (1760m)

Oui, mais cela ne contribue pas à expliquer pas le décalage HN / HS, au contraire. En moyenne, il y a toujours plus d'aérosols anthropique en HN qu'en HS, donc on peut supposer l'effet inverse (les aérosols contribuent plus à refroidir l'HN et à égaliser les deux hémisphères).

Je développe ma pensée concernant les aérosols en prenant des chiffres sans rapport avec la réalité.

Supposons donc un forçage moyen des aérosols, pendant la période de référence, de -5 pour l'HN et de -2 pour l'HS.

Si ces forçages deviennent respectivement -2 et -1 les anomalies de températures correspondantes seront +2°C et +0.7°C.

L' anomalie sera donc plus importante pour l'HN que pour l'HS et ceci apparaîtra sur les cartes globales.

Mon raisonnement et donc l'inverse du tien, il faut voir la diminution relative des concentrations en aérosols.

voici d'ailleurs ci-dessous l'évolution de la température pour la période 1950-1980/1920-1950.

l'exercice est certes périlleux mais l'on voit plutôt un réchauffement plus accentué dans l'HS que dans l'HN.

On connait bien les émissions importantes d'aérosols dans les zones très industrialisées de l'HN à cette période.

hnhsyn8.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je n'étais pas revenu sur ce fil: vous êtes des pinailleurs de première.

Les pouièmes de variation du CO2 etre HS et HN sont sans intérêt ici et ma réponse à Alain Costou reste parfaitement valable.

Vous devriez quand même savoir que quand on compare desux quantités et qu'on dit que l'écart est négligeable, c'est dans un contexte donné.

Pour en revenir au sujet, la raison essentielle du décalage entre les deux hémisphères, c'est le rôle de l'océan. Enfin, quoi! c'est un classique qu'on a appris à l'école primaire , la différence climat continental/climat océanique .

On peut trouver divers intermédiaires

soit directement l'effet tampon lui même (la chaleur est absorbée par la CLO

soit indirectement via une variation de la couverture nuageuse éventuellement mais c'est dans les régions océaniques que cette variation (rétroaction????) peut avoir lieu.

Pour finir, l'argument de meteor sur les aérosols n'est snas doute pas pertinent. En tout cas en ce qui concerne l'effet direct car la durée de vie des aérosols est vraiment très courte (15 jours). Sur l'effet indirect, c'est peut être moins sûr car alors il y a compensation avec le fait que les nuages de l'HS sont beaucoup plus sensibles à l'effet indirect du fait de la rareté des aérosols au départ. Autrement dit, il y a pas beaucoup d'aérosols anthriopiques dans l'HS mais ils ont davantage d'influence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

Location : Muret(180 m) et Font-Romeu (1760m)

Concernant les aérosols, leur baisse relativement importante à partir de 1990 doit avoir une importance nettement plus grande que 1 ou 2 ppm de CO2.

Lorsque je regarde les forçages estimés des aérosols(TAR GIEC 2001), effets direct et indirects, il n'y a pas photo quant à la différence entre HN et HS.

Alors je ne sais si cela a une influence dans le pb qui nous préoccupe mais il me semble que la baisse en concentration a principalement touché l'HN.

Il semble logique qu'une augmentation de température locale soit plus sensible dans les régions où "le ciel s'éclaircit d'avantage".

arosolsti7.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Autant pour moi, j'ai raisonné de travers. default_online2long.gif

En simplifiant à outrance, il n' y a pas eu (jamais) d'aérosols anthropiques dans l'HS donc pas de compensation relative dans l'HS mais au contraire compensation dans l'HN. Si on diminue la quantité d'aérosols anthropiques , cela agit évidemment sur l'HN dont le réchauffementy s'accélère.

Ca ne change pas le fait que la prédominance océanique est essentielle mais tu as raison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Je suis assez étonné des valeurs faibles sur l'Arctique. Voir par exemple cette référence :

http://zardoz.nilu.no/~andreas/POLARCAT/BGAerosol.html

"Absorption and scattering of radiation by aerosols directly affect the radiation balance of the Arctic . This region is thought to be particularly sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes because of the small amount of solar energy normally absorbed in the polar regions."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

La réponse est simple: il n'y a pas de mesures. Les méthodes employées ne marchent pas au dessus des surfaces très réfléchissantes (regarde aussi le Groenland par exemple).

A propos de ce que tu cites, je ne serais pas étonné que tu l'interprète de travers.

Les aérosols au dessus de l'Antactique le réchaufferaient et pas l'inverse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Non, je parle bien de l'Arctique (sur l'Antarctique, pas trop d'aérosols anthrop. de toute façon). Sur le bilan, pas très évident. Voir aussi :

htpp://fizz.phys.dal.ca/~hu/acpd-5-9039.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...